Hip hop culture and its history...

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Hip hop culture and its history...

Post  Sanjiv on Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:56 pm

Introduction:

Emceeing:

Emcee is derived from the abbreviation M.C. or "Master of Ceremonies," which also implies "move the crowd." An emcee is a person who raps to inspire people with well-written, crisply-delivered, clear and concise lyrics. Most people would rather 'rap' or rhyme words in a catchy manner, but very few take the time to actually emcee. The likes of Melle Mel and Nas barely falter in the field of emceeing.

From An Emcee's Perspective:
In his book, *The Art of Emceeing, Stic.man of dead prez writes, "A rapper is to an emcee what an average street fighter is to a trained martial artist. The are both fighters but the degree and depth of their skill is very different."

The Origin of Emceeing:
Emceeing has been in existence prior to the days of slavery, way before the United States even existed. African griots or poets, who delivered their rhythmic folk tales over drums and other forms of instrumentation, are often cited as the innovators of what is now known as rap.

Elements of Emceeing: Certified emcees stand out because they share certain elements in common.
Rhyme Scheme: This is also known as rhyme structure. An emcee's rhyme scheme refers to the pattern of his rhymes. This ranges from basic (Kanye West) to complex (Eminem).

Delivery: The way an emcee flows may depend on his cadence, speed, melody, intonation, rhythm, enunciation, and even accent. This is known as delivery. Both Eminem and Jay-Z possess the ability to alternate their flow and delivery with adept swiftness.

Word Play: One listen to the late Notorious B.I.G. and our session on word play is complete. Biggie had the ability to experiment with words creatively.

Some Notable Emcees:

Nas
Rakim
KRS-One
Black Thought
Eminem
dead.prez
Common
Melle Mel
Chuck D
Mos Def

Timeline:
1925: Earl Tucker (aka Snake Hips), a performer at the Cotton Club invents a dance style similar to today...


Last edited by Sanjiv on Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:05 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Hip hop culture and its history...

Post  Sanjiv on Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:01 am

Hip hop culture:

Hip hop is a subculture, which is said to have begun with the work of DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and Afrika Bambaattaa. The four main aspects, or "elements", of hip hop culture are MCing (rapping), DJing, urban inspired art/tagging (graffiti), and b-boying (or breakdancing). Equally vital but not always recognizable is the fifth element, the element of "building" (raising consciousness). The most known "extended" elements are beatboxing, hip hop fashion, and hip hop slang.

DJing:

While hip hop did not invent DJing, it has extended its boundaries and techniques. The first hip hop DJ was Kool DJ Herc, who created hip hop through the isolation of "breaks" (the parts of albums that focused solely on the beat). In addition to developing Herc's techniques, DJs Grandmaster Flash, Grand Wizard Theodore, and Grandmaster Caz made further innovations with the introduction of scratching.

Traditionally, a DJ will use two turntables simultaneously. These are connected to a DJ mixer, an amplifier, speakers, and various other pieces of electronic music equipment. The DJ will then perform various tricks between the two albums currently in rotation using the above listed methods. The result is a unique sound created by the seemingly combined sound of two separate songs into one song. A DJ should not be confused with a producer of a music track (though there is considerable overlap between the two roles).

In the early years of hip hop, the DJs were the stars, but their limelight has been taken by MCs since 1978, thanks largely to Melle Mel of Grandmaster Flash's crew, the Furious Five. However, a number of DJs have gained stardom nonetheless in recent years. Famous DJs include Grandmaster Flash, Mr. Magic, DJ Jazzy Jeff, DJ Scratch from EPMD, DJ Premier from Gang Starr, DJ Scott La Rock from Boogie Down Productions, DJ Pete Rock of Pete Rock & CL Smooth, DJ Muggs from Cypress Hill, Jam Master Jay from Run-DMC, Eric B., Funkmaster Flex, Tony Touch, DJ Clue, DJ Q-Bert. The underground movement of turntablism has also emerged to focus on the skills of the DJ.


Rapping:

Rapping, also known as Emceeing, MCing, Rhyme spitting, Spitting, or just Rhyming, is the rhythmic delivery of rhymes, one of the central elements of hip hop music and culture. Although the word rap has sometimes been claimed to be a backronym of the phrase "Rhythmic American Poetry", "Rhythm and Poetry", "Rhythmically Applied Poetry", or "Rhythmically Associated Poetry", use of the word to describe quick and slangy speech or repartee long predates the musical form.[1] Rapping can be delivered over a beat or without accompaniment.

Graffiti:


In America around the late 1960s, graffiti was used as a form of expression by political activists, and also by gangs such as the Savage Skulls, La Familia, and Savage Nomads to mark territory. Towards the end of the 1960s, the signatures—tags—of Philadelphia graffiti writers Top Cat,[2] Cool Earl and Cornbread started to appear.[3] Around 1970-71, the centre of graffiti innovation moved to New York City where writers following in the wake of TAKI 183 and Tracy 168 would add their street number to their nickname, "bomb" a train with their work, and let the subway take it—and their fame, if it was impressive, or simply pervasive, enough—"all city". Bubble lettering held sway initially among writers from the Bronx, though the elaborate Brooklyn style Tracy 168 dubbed "wildstyle" would come to define the art.[2][4] The early trendsetters were joined in the 70s by artists like Dondi, Futura 2000, Daze, Blade, Lee, Zephyr, Rammellzee, Crash, Kel, NOC 167 and Lady Pink.[2]

The relationship between graffiti and hip hop culture arises both from early graffiti artists practicing other aspects of hip hop, and its being practiced in areas where other elements of hip hop were evolving as art forms. Graffiti is recognized as a visual expression of rap music, just as breakdancing is viewed as a physical expression. The book Subway Art (New York: Henry Holt & Co, 1984) and the TV program Style Wars (first shown on the PBS channel in 1984) were among the first ways the mainstream public were introduced to hip hop graffiti.
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Re: Hip hop culture and its history...

Post  Sanjiv on Tue Nov 04, 2008 12:11 am

Literature:

Hip Hop literature began with urban street lit. Groundbreakers were Iceberg Slim, Donald Goines & Chester Himes. From this evolved the current genre hip-hop fiction which includes gangster literature.

Break dancing:

B-boying, also known as breaking or B-girling (for women) by its practitioners and followers, is a dynamic style of dance. Breaking began to take form in the South Bronx alongside the other elements of hip hop. The "B" in B-boy stands for break, as in break-boy (or girl).The term "B-boy" originated from the dancers at DJ Kool Herc's parties, who saved their best dance moves for the break section of the song, getting in front of the audience to dance in a distinctive, frenetic style. According to the documentary film The Freshest Kids, a history of the b-boy; DJ Kool Herc describes the b in b-boy as short for breaking which at the time was slang for "going off" also one of the original names for the dance. However, early on the dance was known as the "boiong" (the sound a spring makes). Breaking was briefly documented for release to a world wide audience for the first time in Style Wars, and was later given a little more focus in the fictional film Beat Street. The Zulu Kings are believed to be earliest B-Boy "crew."

BBoying is one of the major elements of hip hop culture, commonly associated with, but distinct from, "popping", "locking", "hitting", "ticking", "boogaloo", and other funk styles that evolved independently during the late 1960s in California. It was common during the 1980s to see a group of people with a radio on a playground, basketball court, or sidewalk performing a bboy show for a large audience.

Beat boxing:

Beatboxing, popularized by Doug E. Fresh, is the vocal percussion of hip hop culture. It is primarily concerned with the art of creating beats, rhythms, and melodies using the human mouth. The term beatboxing is derived from the mimicry of the first generation of drum machines, then known as beatboxes. As it is a way of creating hip-hop music, it can be categorized under the production element of hip-hop, though it does sometimes include a type of rapping intersected with the human-created beat.

The art form enjoyed a strong presence in the '80s with artists like the Darren "Buffy, the Human Beat Box" Robinson of the Fat Boys and Biz Markie showing their beatboxing skills. Beatboxing declined in popularity along with break dancing in the late '80s, and almost slipped even deeper than the underground. Beatboxing has been enjoying a resurgence since the late '90s, marked by the release of "Make the Music 2000." by Rahzel of The Roots (known for even singing while beatboxing).

As it grew and developed into a multi-billion dollar industry, the scope of hip hop culture grew beyond the boundaries of its traditional four elements. KRS-ONE, a rapper from the golden age of hip hop, names nine elements of hip hop culture: the traditional four and beatboxing, plus hip hop fashion, hip hop slang, street knowledge, and street entrepreneurship. He also suggests that hip hop is a cultural movement and that the word itself had to reflect this. He spells it Hiphop (one word, capital "h") and this is reflected in his Temple of Hiphop.
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Re: Hip hop culture and its history...

Post  brain damaged on Tue Nov 04, 2008 2:02 am

Sanjiv wrote:Introduction:

Emceeing:

Emcee is derived from the abbreviation M.C. or "Master of Ceremonies," which also implies "move the crowd."
I found on some site that MC is Mic Controler or some like that, and it have many other meanings like the shown above...
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Re: Hip hop culture and its history...

Post  Sanjiv on Tue Nov 04, 2008 5:54 pm

can be dude... there are many names fo it...
its also called Micro Jockey though its MJ...
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